Pharology - Lighthouses of Scotland
Cantick Head

The lighthouse viewed from the rear. [Photo: Ken Trethewey (2016)]

The lighthouse viewed from the rear. [Photo: Ken Trethewey (2016)]

Although it does not have a high elevation, the lighthouse is close to some rugged rocks. [Photo: Ken Trethewey (2016)]

A broad view of the station. [Photo: Ken Trethewey (2016)]

The modern lighting apparatus has no large optic surrounding it, but is comprised of primary and secondary units of LED lights. [Photo: Ken Trethewey (2016)]

A view from the balcony. [Photo: Ken Trethewey (2016)]

The old keepers cottages have been privately owned since just after automation. [Photo: Ken Trethewey (2016)]

A view from the balcony. The modern house is also privately owned. [Photo: Ken Trethewey (2016)]

The lighthouse attendant makes his regular rounds and uses the old building just inside the station gates.. [Photo: Ken Trethewey (2016)]

The attendant for our 2016 visit, John "Johnny" Mowat. [Photo: Ken Trethewey (2016)]

This very rare item is the original optical apparatus from the Cantick Head lighthouse and is to be found in the Scapa Flow Museum on Hoy at Lyness. It is comprised of three parabolic mirror reflectors mounted on a mechanism that is rotated by the clockwork engine below. As far as is known there is only one other such apparatus in existence and is to be found at the National Lighthouse Museum at Fraserburgh, Scotland. A pressurised paraffin light was originally mounted inside at the focal point of the device. It was not replaced until 1950 (below). [Photo: Ken Trethewey (2016)]